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Dhamma Niranjana

Vipassana Center, Nanded

Introduction to Vipassana

The technique of Vipassana is a simple, practical way to achieve real peace of mind and to lead a happy, useful life. Vipassana means "to see things as they really are"; it is a logical process of mental purification through self-observation.From time to time, we all experience agitation, frustration and disharmony. When we suffer, we do not keep our misery limited to ourselves; instead, we keep distributing it to others. Read More

About Vipassana

Nature

Vipassana, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India's most ancient techniques of meditation. It was rediscovered by Gotama Buddha more than 2500 years ago and was taught by him as a universal remedy for universal ills, i.e., an Art Of Living. This non-sectarian technique aims for the total eradication of mental impurities and the resultant highest happiness
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Mr.Satya Narayan Goenka

Nature

Mr. Satya Narayan Goenka (born 1924) is the Principal Teacher of Vipassana, the practical quintessence of the Buddha's teaching. A leading industrialist in Myanmar(Burma) after the Second World War, Goenkaji, as he is affectionately known outside India, is living proof that the mental exercise of meditation is necessary for a wholesome and beneficial life.
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Chain Of Teachers

Nature

Ven Ledi Sayadaw, Saya Thetgyi (1873-1945),Sayagyi U Ba Khin (1899-1971) and S.N.Goenka (1924-2013), Goenkaji as he is widely and respectfully referred to, is well known in numerous countries of the world as a master teacher of meditation. He received the technique that he teaches in the 1950’s from Sayagyi U Ba Khin of Burma, who in turn received it from
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Dhamma Niranjan

Dhamma Niranjana is one of the numerous Vipassana centers in the state of Maharashtra. It is located at the Bank of River Godavari near the city of Nanded. Dhamma Niranjana is easily accessible via rail and ground transportation. Read More

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Historical Background :

Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Kendra is one of the numerous centers in the state of Maharashtra. It is located at the bank of Godawary river. It is near to Nanded city. Dhamma Niranjan vipassana centre is easily accessible by rail and ground transportation also.There are the references about the historical background in tipitac. As per the evidences in archeological survey, in the modern age it is proved that ever illuminating race of Dhamma reached Godavari territory in Marathwada region of Maharashtra during the life time of Lord Gautama the Buddha. The eye Kosal Brahmin named Bawari, Purohit of King Prasannajeet, had left Savathi (Capital of Kosal) to setup his hermitage on river Godavari. Bawari retired to a land “Antardeep” in Godavari where two kings Aasak and Alka gave him a tract of land. Bavari prepared a great Yajana “sacrifice”. He gifted away everything is Yajana. On the same time Another Brahmin appeared before him and demanded five hundred coins (kashyarpan). Bravari said “kindly pardon me I do not have anything to give you” The Brahmin curse Bravari and said “May your head on the 7th day cleave into 7th. Bravery became sorrowful and worried. It has so happened that Benevolent deity approach measurable Bravery and disclosed him that “the exact meaning of head splitting might be explained by some Buddha, perfectly enlightened”. So you can approach him to ascertained the meaning of it. After hearing the existence of Buddha, Bravery became happy and rejoicing. Bravery called his 16 eminent and learned disciples and explained them about the 32 marks to recognize the Buddha. He also disclosed his disciples that if some one generate the question inside the mind, Buddha will give the answer of their questions. Bravarie’s all 16 disciples departed towards North and through Alka, Patithan (modern Paithan), Mahisathi, Ujjeni… Saket and Savathi Rajgrah to Pasanakchetiya. When these disciples appeared before Buddha they got satisfied that such a great human being who bears 32 characteristic. Ajitha one of the 16 disciples of Bravari first ask the question followed by another disciples. In turn Buddha replied to all Bravari,s disciples and their 16,000 followers.

At the conclusion of Buddha’s preaching, they became Arhant, only Pingiya the nephew of Bravari who became Anagami. It is only because that at the time of preaching of Buddha he was thinking about Bravari. Pinkeye return back to Bravery on the bank of Godavari river in territory of Marathwada.

At the end of his recital the Buddha appeared before them in a rare of glory and preached them. Pigiya became an Arahant and Bravari Anagami. Thus Bravery and his disciples spread Dhamma (Vipassana) in the territory of Godavari of (Marathwada Region) of Maharashtra. Buddha’s Statues of time of king Rashtrakuta in tenth centaury are found in Kandhar and Mukhed Taluka, Dist. Nanded. In the territory of Godavari one of the Buddhas Statues at Kandhar is having inscription (Shilalekh) from front side of the statue at words in Sanskrit are (Hey dharma hetu prabhava hetutansha tathagato havdutt teshanch yo nirodha aew vadi mahashraman.)

This inscription (Shilalekh) is of the same period. The meaning of this inscription in brief is “If there is cause, effect is to be their, if no cause there is no effect” Paticchasamuppada” the law of dependent origination. It is evident that Pujaniya guruji Satyanarayan Goenka visited Nanded on January 1988 and delivered his discourse at Bawary Ngar. This place is adjacent to the east side of Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Centre. References from the discourses given by Pujyaniya Guruji communicates that land where people have already mediated in the past, Vibrations of Dharma attracted towards it. Therefore, it seems that the history is getting repeated for the establishment of Dharma Niranian Vipassana Centre on this sacred land which is located on the bank of Godavari river, Nanded.

The first 10-days vipassana course was convened in a gipsy camp during May 5 to 15/1998. Since then the activities of vipassana which includes 10-days vipassana course, children courses have been started. It is pertinent to highlight here that Three 10-days vipassana courses (During 2000 to 2012) were convened only for those who are suffering from leprosy. Beside it, Ten days vipassana courses (Gipsy camps) were convened at Aundha Nannath district Beed, Swamy Ramanand Tirth Marathwada Univeristy Nanded, I.T.I technical school Hinogli district Hingoli.

There was the strong wish of Pujaniya Guruji that the technique of Anapana should reach to school children at village level so that with the consensus of Government of Maharashtra official programme under the caption of MITRA (Mind in Training with Right Awareness) was launched. To facilitate this MITRA upkram, vipassana 10-days courses exclusively for middle school Teachers, working under Maharashtra govt. have been organized. Total Eight 10-days courses exclusively for school teachers were organized.

Pujyaniya Guriji was always promoting for Dhamma Yatra (visit to sacred places of Buddha) to old vipassana meditators. With the consent of the office of Pujaniya Guruji and Mataji, Dhamma tours along with the 10-days or STP courses were convened at following places. 1. Boudh Gaya (August 14 to 30/2009), 2. Lumbani ) Sept. 1 to 15/2010), 3. Myanmar ( Oct. 5 to 25/2011) 4. Srilanka (Feb. 12 to 27/ 2015) and 5. Shrawasti ( July 29 to August 15/2016).

Because of the enormous efforts by the old meditators along with Dhamma the support of office bearers of Nanded Vipassana Samiti Govt. of Maharashtra was so liberal and allotted Five acres of land on lease of Thirty years on the bank of Godawary on Nov. 25/2009). Government of Maharashtra is also so compassionate that, this land measuring Two Hectors has been kept reserved of “Vipassana Centre”. This notification have been published in govt. Gazette on May 14/2014.

One old “Samadhi” of Gautam Rushi is located adjacent to this land. It is reportedly said that one Gautama Rushi (A disciple of Bawari Rushi) spend his considerable period of his life on this land.

In 2010, Pujyda Guruji had given the name “Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Cenre”. After getting legal permission for the constructions of the vipassana centre, construction activities have been initiated. So far 1. Residential accommodation for Twenty male in cabins attach with Toilet Bath for male. 2. Common toilet and bath for male and female 3. Residential accommodation for Course Conducting Teacher 4. Mini Dhamma Hall cum office building 5. Accommodation for Centre Teacher 6. Sixteen independent room for female. 7. First phase of Main Dhamma hall have been completed. At present this is being used temporarily as Dhamma hall.

Double Gender (20-Male and 20-Female) 10-days courses have been started.

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Location :

From the references in Tipitak and archeological evidences in modern age it is proved that ever illuminating rays of Dhamma reached Godavari territory in Marathwada region of Maharashtra during the lifetime of Lord Goutam Buddha. A kosal brahmin named Bavari, Purohit of king Prasenjit had left savathi (capital of Kosal) to set up his hermitage on river Godavari Bavari retired to an island (antardipa) in Godavari where two kings Assak and Alaka gave him a tract of land. The Bavari prepared a great sacrifice (Yajna).He gifted away everything in Yajna.

Another brahmin came to him and demanded five hundred coins (Kasharpan) Bavari said “Please pardon me, I do not have anything to give you” Brahmin cursed on Bavari “May your head on the seventh day cleave into seven” Bavari became sorrowful and worried. The benevolent diety approached miserable Bavari and said him that head and head splitting is better known by Sambuddha, perfectly enlightened. So you

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What is Vipassana meditation?

Vipassana, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India's most ancient techniques of meditation. It was rediscovered by Gotama Buddha more than 2500 years ago and was taught by him as a universal remedy for universal ills, i.e., an Art Of Living. This non-sectarian technique aims for the total eradication of mental impurities and the resultant highest happiness of full liberation.

Vipassana is a way of self-transformation through self-observation. It focuses on the deep interconnection between mind and body, which can be experienced directly by disciplined attention to the physical sensations that form the life of the body, and that continuously interconnect and condition the life of the mind. It is this observation-based, self-exploratory journey to the common root of mind and body that dissolves mental impurity, resulting in a balanced mind full of love and compassion.

The scientific laws that operate one's thoughts, feelings, judgements and sensations become clear. Through direct experience, the nature of how one grows or regresses, how one produces suffering or frees oneself from suffering is understood. Life becomes characterized by increased awareness, non-delusion, self-control and peace.

The Tradition

Since the time of Buddha, Vipassana has been handed down, to the present day, by an unbroken chain of teachers. Although Indian by descent, the current teacher in this chain, Mr. S.N. Goenka, was born and raised in Burma (Myanmar). While living there he had the good fortune to learn Vipassana from his teacher, Sayagyi U Ba Khin who was at the time a high Government official. After receiving training from his teacher for fourteen years, Mr. Goenka settled in India and began teaching Vipassana in 1969. Since then he has taught tens of thousands of people of all races and all religions in both the East and West. In 1982 he began to appoint assistant teachers to help him meet the growing demand for Vipassana courses.

The Courses

The technique is taught at ten-day residential courses during which participants follow a prescribed Code of Discipline, learn the basics of the method, and practice sufficiently to experience its beneficial results.

The course requires hard, serious work. There are three steps to the training. The first step is, for the period of the course, to abstain from killing, stealing, sexual activity, speaking falsely, and intoxicants. This simple code of moral conduct serves to calm the mind, which otherwise would be too agitated to perform the task of self-observation. The next step is to develop some mastery over the mind by learning to fix one's attention on the natural reality of the ever changing flow of breath as it enters and leaves the nostrils. By the fourth day the mind is calmer and more focused, better able to undertake the practice of Vipassana itself: observing sensations throughout the body, understanding their nature, and developing equanimity by learning not to react to them. Finally, on the last full day participants learn the meditation of loving kindness or goodwill towards all, in which the purity developed during the course is shared with all beings.

The entire practice is actually a mental training. Just as we use physical exercises to improve our bodily health, Vipassana can be used to develop a healthy mind.

Because it has been found to be genuinely helpful, great emphasis is put on preserving the technique in its original, authentic form. It is not taught commercially, but instead is offered freely. No person involved in its teaching receives any material remuneration. There are no charges for the courses - not even to cover the cost of food and accommodation. All expenses are met by donations from people who, having completed a course and experienced the benefits of Vipassana, wish to give others the opportunity to benefit from it also.

Of course, the results come gradually through continued practice. It is unrealistic to expect all problems to be solved in ten days. Within that time, however, the essentials of Vipassana can be learned so that it can be applied in daily life. The more the technique is practiced, the greater the freedom from misery, and the closer the approach to the ultimate goal of full liberation. Even ten days can provide results which are vivid and obviously beneficial in everyday life.

All sincere people are welcome to join a Vipassana course to see for themselves how the technique works and to measure the benefits. All those who try it will find Vipassana to be an invaluable tool with which to achieve and share real happiness with others.

A Non-Sectarian Technique

Although Vipassana is a part of Buddha's teaching, it contains nothing of a sectarian nature, and can be accepted and applied by people of any background. The Buddha himself taught Dhamma (the way, the truth, the path). He did not call his followers "Buddhists"; he referred to them as "Dhammists" (those who follow the truth). The technique works on the basis that all human beings share the same problems, and a pragmatic method which can eradicate these problems can be universally practiced.

Vipassana courses are open to anyone sincerely wishing to learn the technique, irrespective of race, caste, faith or nationality. Hindus, Jains, Muslims, Sikhs, Buddhists, Christians, Jews as well as members of other religions have all successfully practiced Vipassana. The malady is universal; therefore, the remedy has to be universal. For example, when we experience anger, this anger is not Hindu anger or Christian anger, Chinese anger or American anger. Similarly, love and compassion are not the strict province of any community or creed: they are universal human qualities resulting from purity of mind. People from all backgrounds who practice Vipassana find that they become better human beings.

What Vipassana is not

  1. It is not a rite or ritual based on blind faith.

  2. It is neither an intellectual nor a philosophical entertainment.

  3. It is not a rest cure, a holiday, or an opportunity for socializing.

  4. It is not an escape from the trials and tribulations of everyday life.

What Vipassana is:

  1. It is a technique that will eradicate suffering.

  2. It is a method of mental purification which allows one to face life’s tensions and problems in a calm, balanced way.

  3. It is an art of living that one can use to make positive contributions to society.

Vipassana meditation aims at the highest spiritual goals of total liberation and full enlightenment. Its purpose is never simply to cure physical disease. However, as a by-product of mental purification, many psychosomatic diseases are eradicated. In fact, Vipassana eliminates the three causes of all unhappiness: craving, aversion and ignorance. With continued practice, the meditation releases the tensions developed in everyday life, opening the knots tied by the old habit of reacting in an unbalanced way to pleasant and unpleasant situations.

Although Vipassana was developed as a technique by the Buddha, its practice is not limited to Buddhists. There is absolutely no question of conversion. The technique works on the simple basis that all human beings share the same problems and a technique which can eradicate these problems will have a universal application. People from many religious denominations have experienced the benefits of Vipassana meditation, and have found no conflict with their profession of faith.

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Meditation and Self-discipline

The process of self-purification by introspection is certainly never easy–students have to work very hard at it. By their own efforts students arrive at their own realizations; no one else can do this for them. Therefore, the meditation will suit only those willing to work seriously and observe the discipline, which is there for the benefit and protection of the meditators and is an integral part of the meditation practice.

Ten days is certainly a very short time in which to penetrate the deepest levels of the unconscious mind and learn how to eradicate the complexes lying there. Continuity of the practice in seclusion is the secret of this technique’s success. Rules and regulations have been developed keeping this practical aspect in mind. They are not primarily for the benefit of the teacher or the course management, nor are they negative expressions of tradition, orthodoxy or blind faith in some organized religion. Rather, they are based on the practical experience of thousands of meditators over the years and are both scientific and rational. Abiding by the rules creates a very conducive atmosphere for meditation; breaking them pollutes it.

A student will have to stay for the entire period of the course. The other rules should also be carefully read and considered. Only those who feel that they can honestly and scrupulously follow the discipline should apply for admission. Those not prepared to make a determined effort will waste their time and, moreover, will disturb others who wish to work seriously. A prospective student should also understand that it would be both disadvantageous and inadvisable to leave without finishing the course upon finding the discipline too difficult. Likewise, it would be most unfortunate if, in spite of repeated reminders, a student does not follow the rules and has to be asked to leave.

Persons With Serious Mental Disorders

People with serious mental disorders have occasionally come to Vipassana courses with the unrealistic expectation that the technique will cure or alleviate their mental problems. Unstable interpersonal relationships and a history of various treatments can be additional factors which make it difficult for such people to benefit from, or even complete, a ten-day course. Our capacity as a nonprofessional volunteer organization makes it impossible for us to properly care for people with these backgrounds. Although Vipassana meditation is beneficial for most people, it is not a substitute for medical or psychiatric treatment and we do not recommend it for people with serious psychiatric disorders.

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Code of Discipline :

The foundation of the practice is sila --moral conduct. Sila provides a basis for the development of samadhi --concentration of mind; and purification of the mind is achieved through panna --the wisdom of insight.

The Precepts:

All who attend a Vipassana course must conscientiously undertake the following five precepts for the duration of the course: 1. to abstain from killing any living creature; 2. to abstain from stealing; 3. to abstain from all sexual activity; 4. to abstain from telling lies; 5. to abstain from all intoxicants. There are three additional precepts which old students (that is, those who have completed a course with S.N. Goenka or one of is assistant teachers) are expected to follow: 6. to abstain from eating after midday; 7. to abstain from sensual entertainment and bodily decoration; 8. to abstain from using high or luxurious beds. Old students will observe the sixth precept by having only herb tea or fruit juice at the 5 p.m. break, whereas new student may have tea with milk and some fruit. The teacher may excuse an old student from observing this precept for health reasons. The seventh and eighth precept will be observed by all.

Acceptance of the Teacher and the Technique

Students must declare themselves willing to comply fully and for the duration of the course with the teacher's guidance and instructions; that is, to observe the discipline and to meditate exactly as the teacher asks, without ignoring any part of the instructions, nor adding anything to them. This acceptance should be one of discrimination and understanding, not blind submission. Only with an attitude of trust can a student work diligently and thoroughly. Such confidence in the teacher and the technique is essential for success in meditation.

Other Techniques, Rites, and Forms of Worship

During the course it is absolutely essential that all forms of prayer, worship, or religious ceremony--fasting, burning incense, counting beads, reciting mantras, singing and dancing, etc.--be discontinued. All other meditation techniques and healing or spiritual practices should also be suspended. This is not to condemn any other technique or practice, but to give a fair trial to the technique of Vipassana in its purity. Students are strongly advised that deliberately mixing other techniques of meditation with Vipassana will impede and even reverse their progress. Despite repeated warnings by the teacher, there have been cases in the past where students have intentionally mixed this technique with a ritual or another practice, and have done themselves a great disservice. Any doubts or confusion which may arise should always be clarified by meeting with the teacher.

Interviews With the Teacher

Problems or questions regarding the meditation should be taken only to the teacher for clarification. The time between 12 noon and 1 p.m. is set aside for private interviews. Questions may also be asked in public between 9:00 and 9:30 p.m. in the meditation hall. Interviews and question times are solely for the purpose of clarifying actual practical problems concerned with the technique. They are not to be regarded as opportunities to indulge in philosophical discussions or intellectual arguments. The unique nature of Vipassana meditation can only be appreciated by putting it into practice and during the course students should concentrate exclusively on this task.

Noble Silence

All students must observe Noble Silence from the beginning of the course until the morning of the last full day. Noble Silence means silence of body, speech, and mind. Any form of communication with fellow student, whether by gestures, sign language, written notes, etc., is prohibited. Students may, however, speak with the teacher whenever necessary and they may approach the management with any problems related to food, accommodation, health, etc. But even these contacts should be kept to a minimum. Students should cultivate the feeling that they are working in isolation.

Yoga and Physical Exercise

Although physical yoga and other exercises are compatible with Vipassana, they should be suspended during the course because proper secluded facilities are not available at the course site. Jogging is also not permitted. Students may exercise during rest periods by walking in the designated areas.

Religious Objects, Rosaries, Crystals, Talismans, etc.

No such items should be brought to the course site. If brought inadvertently they should be deposited with the management for the duration of the course.

Intoxicants and Drugs

No drugs, alcohol, chewing tobacco or other intoxicants should be brought to the site; this also applies to tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and all other sedatives. Those taking medicines or drugs on a doctor's prescription should notify the teacher.

Tobacco

For the health and comfort of all students, smoking, chewing tobacco, and taking snuff are not permitted at the course.

Food

It is not possible to satisfy the special food preferences and requirements of all the meditators. Students are therefore kindly requested to make do with the simple vegetarian meals provided. The course management endeavours to prepare a balanced, wholesome menu suitable for meditation. If any students have been prescribed a special diet because of ill-health, they should inform the management at the time of application.

Clothing

Dress should be simple, modest, and comfortable. Tight, transparent, revealing, or otherwise striking clothing (such as shorts, short skirts, tights and leggings, sleeveless or skimpy tops) should not be worn. Sunbathing and partial nudity are not permitted. This is important in order to minimize distraction to others.

Outside Contacts

Students must remain within the course boundaries throughout the course. They may leave only with the specific consent of the teacher. No outside communications is allowed before the course ends. This includes letters, phone calls and visitors. In case of an emergency, a friend or relative may contact the management.

Music, reading and Writing

The playing of musical instruments, radios, etc. is not permitted. No reading or writing materials should be brought to the course. Students should not distract themselves by taking notes. The restriction on reading and writing is to emphasize the strictly practical nature of this mediation.

Tape Recorders and Cameras

These may not be used except with the express permission of the teacher.

Course Finances

According to the tradition of pure Vipassana, courses are run solely on a donation basis. Donations are accepted only from old students, that is, those who have completed at least one course with S.N. Goenka or an assistant teacher. In this way course are supported by those who have realized for themselves the benefits of the practice. Wishing to share these benefits with others, one gives a donation according to one's means and volition. Some taking a course for the first time may give a donation at the end of the course or at any time thereafter. Such donations are the only source of funding for courses in this tradition around the world. There is not wealthy foundation or individual sponsoring them. Neither the teachers nor the organizers receive any kind of payment for their service. Thus, the spread of Vipassana is carried out with purity of purpose, free from any commercialism. Whether a donation is large or small, it should be given with the wish to help others: 'The course I have taken has been paid for through the generosity of past students; now let me give something towards the cost of a future course, so that others may also benefit by this technique.

Summary

To clarify the spirit behind the discipline and rules, they may be summarized as follows: Take great care that your actions do not disturb anyone. Take no notice of distractions caused by others. It may be that a student cannot understand the practical reasons for one or several of the above rules. Rather than allow negativity and doubt to develop, immediate clarification should be sought from the teacher. It is only by taking a disciplined approach and by making maximum effort that a student can fully grasp the practice and benefit from it. The emphasis during the course is on work. A golden rule is to meditate as if one were alone, with one's mind turned inward, ignoring any inconveniences and distractions that one may encounter. Finally, students should note that their progress in Vipassana depends solely on their own good qualities and personal development and on five factors: earnest efforts, confidence, sincerity, health and wisdom. May the above information help you to obtain maximum benefit from your meditation course. We are happy to have the opportunity to serve, and wish you peace and harmony from you experience of Vipassana.

THE COURSE TIMETABLE

The following timetable for the course has been designed be maintain the continuity of practice. For best results students are advised to follow it as closely as possible.

4:00 a.m. ---------------- Morning wake-up bell

4:30-6:30 a.m. ---------------- Meditate in the hall or your own room

6:30-8:00 a.m. ---------------- Breakfast break

8:00-9:00 a.m. ---------------- GROUP MEDITATION IN THE HALL

9:00-11:00 a.m. ---------------- Meditate in the hall or your own room<

11:00-12:00 noon ---------------- Lunch break

12noon-1:00 p.m. ---------------- Rest and interviews with the teacher

1:00-2:30 p.m. ---------------- Meditate in the hall or your own room

2:30-3:30 p.m. ---------------- GROUP MEDITATION IN THE HALL

3:30-5:00 p.m. ---------------- Meditate in the hall or your own room

5:00-6:00 p.m. ---------------- Tea break

6:00-7:00 p.m. ---------------- GROUP MEDITATION IN THE HALL

7:00-8:15 p.m. ---------------- Teacher's Discourse in the hall

8:15-9:00 p.m. ---------------- GROUP MEDITATION IN THE HALL

9:00-9:30 p.m. ---------------- Question time in the hall

9:30 p.m. ---------------- Retire to your own room--Lights out

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The art of living: Vipassana Meditation

(The following is based on a public talk given by S.N. Goenka in July 1980 in Bern, Switzerland)

Everyone seeks peace and harmony, because these are what we lack in our lives. From time to time we all experience agitation, irritation, disharmony, suffering; and when we suffer from agitation, we do not keep this misery limited to ourselves. We keep distributing it to others as well. The agitation permeates the atmosphere around the miserable person. Everyone else who comes into contact with him becomes irritated, agitated. Certainly this is not the proper way to live.

One ought to live at peace within oneself, and at peace with others. After all, a human being is a social being. One has to live in society-to live and deal with others. How to live peacefully? How to remain harmonious within ourselves, and to maintain peace and harmony around us, so that others also can live peacefully and harmoniously?

When one is agitated, then, to come out of it, one has to know the basic reason for the agitation, the cause of the suffering. If one investigates the problem, it soon becomes clear that whenever one starts generating any negativity or defilement in the mind, one is bound to become agitated. A negativity in the mind-a mental defilement or impurity-cannot coexist with peace and harmony.

How does one start generating negativity? Again investigating, it becomes clear. I become very unhappy when I find someone behaving in a way which I don't like, when I find something happening which I don't like. Unwanted things happen, and I create tension within myself. Wanted things do not happen, some obstacles come in the way, and again I create tension within myself; I start tying knots within myself. Throughout one's life, unwanted things keep happening, wanted things may or may not happen, and this process of reaction, of tying knots-Gordian knots-makes the entire mental and physical structure so tense, so full of negativity. Life becomes miserable.

Now one way to solve the problem is to arrange things such that nothing unwanted happens in my life, and that everything keeps on happening exactly as I desire. I must develop such a power-or somebody else must have the power and must come to my aid whenever I request it-that everything I want keeps happening. But this is not possible. There is no one in the world whose desires are always fulfilled, in whose life everything happens according to his wishes, without anything unwished-for happening. Things keep occurring that are contrary to our desires and wishes. So, in spite of these things which I don't like, how not to react blindly? How not to create tension? How to remain peaceful and harmonious?

In India as well as in other countries, wise saintly persons of the past studied this problem-the problem of human suffering-and they found a solution. If something unwanted happens and one starts to react by generating anger, fear, or any negativity, then as soon as possible one should divert one's attention to something else. For example, get up, take a glass of water, start drinking-your anger will not multiply; you'll be coming out of your anger. Or start counting: one, two, three, four. Or start repeating a word, a phrase, or perhaps some mantra. It becomes easy if you use the name of a deity or a saintly person in whom you have devotion. The mind is diverted, and to some extent you'll be out of the negativity, out of anger.

This solution was helpful; it worked. It still works. Practising this, the mind feels free from agitation. In actuality, however, this solution works only at the conscious level. By diverting one's attention one in fact pushes the negativity deep into the unconscious, and at this level one continues to generate and multiply the same defilement. At the surface level there is a layer of peace and harmony, but in the depths of the mind is a sleeping volcano of suppressed negativity, which keeps erupting in violent explosions from time to time.

Other explorers of inner truth went still further in their search. By experiencing the reality of mind and matter within themselves, they recognized that diverting the attention is only running away from the problem. Escape is no solution; one must face the problem. Whenever a negativity arises in the mind, just observe it, face it. As soon as one starts observing any mental defilement, then it begins to lose all its strength. Slowly it withers away and is uprooted.

A good solution, avoiding both extremes of suppression and of free license. Keeping the negativity in the unconscious will not eradicate it, and allowing it to manifest in physical or vocal action will only create more problems. If one just observes, then the defilement passes away: one has eradicated that negativity, is free from that defilement.

This sounds wonderful, but is it really practical? When anger arises, it overpowers us so quickly that we don't even notice. Then, overpowered by anger, we commit certain actions which are harmful to us and to others. Later, when the anger has passed, we start crying and repenting, begging pardon from this or that person or god: "Oh, I made a mistake. Please excuse me!" Again the next time, in a similar situation, we react in the same way. All this repenting does not help at all.

The difficulty is that I am not aware when a defilement starts. It begins deep at the unconscious level of the mind, and by the time it reaches the conscious level, it has gained so much strength that it overwhelms me. I cannot observe it.

Then I must keep a private secretary with me, so that whenever anger starts, he says, "Look master! Anger is starting!" Since I don't know when this anger will start, I must have three private secretaries for three shifts, around the clock; or rather, four of them to give staggering holidays!

Suppose I can afford that, and the anger starts to arise. At once my secretary tells me, "Oh, master, look! Anger has started." Then the first thing I do is slap and abuse him: "You fool! Do you think you are paid to teach me?" I am so overpowered by anger that no good advice will help.

Suppose that wisdom prevails and I do not slap him. Instead I say, "Thank you very much. Now I must sit down and observe the anger." Is it possible? As soon as I close my eyes and try to observe the anger, immediately the object of anger comes into my mind, the person or incident because of which I became angry. Then I am not observing the anger. Rather, I am observing the external stimulus of the emotion. This will only multiply the anger. This is no solution. It is very difficult to observe any abstract negativity, abstract emotion, divorced from the external object which aroused it.

However, one who reached the ultimate truth in full enlightenment found a real solution. He discovered that whenever any defilement arises in the mind, simultaneously, two things start happening at the physical level. One is that the breath loses its normal rhythm. I start breathing hard whenever a negativity comes into the mind. This is one reality which everyone can experience, though it be very gross and apparent. At the same time, at a subtler level, some kind of biochemical reaction starts within the body-some sensation. Every defilement will generate one sensation or the other inside, in one or another part of the body.

This is a practical solution. An ordinary person cannot observe abstract defilements of the mind-abstract fear, anger or passion. But with proper training and practice, it is very easy to observe the respiration and the sensations, both of which are directly related to the mental defilements. The respiration and the sensations will help me in two ways. First, they will be my private secretaries. As soon as a defilement starts in the mind, my breath will lose its normality. It will start shouting: "Look, something has gone wrong!" I cannot slap the breath; I have to accept the warning. Similarly, the sensations tell me: "Something has gone wrong." I must accept this. Then, having been warned, I start observing the respiration, the sensations, and I find very quickly that the defilement passes away.

This mental-physical phenomenon is like a coin with two sides. On the one side is whatever thoughts or emotions arise in the mind. On the other side are the respiration and sensation in the body. Any thought or emotion (whether conscious or unconscious), any mental defilement manifests in the breath and sensation of that moment. Thus by observing the respiration or sensation, I am indirectly observing the mental defilement. Instead of running away from the problem, I am facing the reality as it is. Then I will find that the defilement loses its strength; it can no longer overpower me as it did in the past. If I persist, the defilement eventually disappears altogether and I remain peaceful and happy.

In this way, the technique of self-observation shows us reality in its two aspects, outside and inside. Previously, one always looked with open eyes, missing the inner truth. I always looked outside for the cause of my unhappiness. I always blamed and tried to change the reality outside. Being ignorant of the inner reality, I never understood that the cause of suffering lies within, in my own blind reactions.

It is difficult to observe an abstract negativity when it arises. But now, by training, I can see the other side of the coin: I can be aware of the breathing and also of what is happening inside me. Whatever it is, the breath or any sensation, I learn to just observe it, without losing the balance of the mind. I stop multiplying my miseries. Instead, I allow the defilement to manifest and pass away.

The more one practises this technique, the more one will find how quickly he or she can come out of the negativity. Gradually the mind becomes freed of defilements; it becomes pure. A pure mind is always full of love, detached love for all others; full of compassion for the failings and sufferings of others; full of joy at their success and happiness; full of equanimity in the face of any situation.

When one reaches this stage, then the entire pattern of one's life starts changing. It is no longer possible for one to do anything vocally or physically which will disturb the peace and happiness of others. Instead, the balanced mind not only becomes peaceful in itself, it helps others to become peaceful also. The atmosphere surrounding such a person will become permeated with peace and harmony, and this will start affecting others too.

This is what the Buddha taught, an art of living. He never established or taught any religion, any "ism." He never instructed followers to practise any rites or rituals, any blind or empty formalities. Instead, he taught to just observe nature as it is, by observing the reality inside. Out of ignorance, one keeps reacting in a way which is harmful to oneself and to others. Then when wisdom arises-the wisdom of observing the reality as it is-one comes out of this blind reaction. When one ceases to react blindly, then one is capable of real action, action proceeding from a balanced, equanimous mind, a mind which sees and understands the truth. Such action can only be positive, creative, helpful to oneself and to others.

What is necessary, then, is to "know thyself"-advice which every wise person has given. One must know oneself not just at the intellectual level, at the level of ideas and theories. Nor does this mean to know oneself at the devotional or emotional level, simply accepting blindly what one has heard or read. Such knowledge is not enough.

Rather, one must know reality at the actual level. One must experience directly the reality of this mental-physical phenomenon. This alone is what will help us to come out of defilements, out of sufferings.

This direct experience of reality within one's own self, this technique of self-observation, is what is called Vipassana meditation. In the language of India in the time of the Buddha, passana meant to look, to see with open eyes, in the ordinary way. But vipassana is to observe things as they really are, not just as they seem to be. Apparent truth has to be penetrated, until one reaches the ultimate truth of the entire mental and physical structure. When one experiences this truth, then one learns to stop reacting blindly, to stop creating defilements. Naturally the old defilements are gradually eradicated. One comes out of all miseries, and experiences happiness.

There are three steps to the training which is given in a Vipassana course. First, one must abstain from any action, physical or vocal, which disturbs the peace and harmony of others. One cannot work to liberate oneself from defilements in the mind while at the same time continuing to perform deeds of body and speech which only multiply those defilements. Therefore a code of morality is the essential first step of the practice. One undertakes not to kill, not to steal, not to commit sexual misconduct, not to speak lies, and not to use intoxicants. By abstaining from such actions, one allows the mind to quiet down.

The next step is to develop some mastery over this wild mind, by training it to remain fixed on a single object, the breath. One tries to keep one's attention on the respiration for as long as possible. This is not a breathing exercise; one does not regulate the breath. Instead one observes the natural respiration as it is, as it comes in, as it goes out. In this way one further calms the mind, so that it is no longer overpowered by violent negativities. At the same time, one is concentrating the mind, making it sharp and penetrating, capable of the work of insight.

These first two steps of living a moral life and controlling the mind are very necessary and beneficial in themselves. But they will lead to self-repression unless one takes the third step: purifying the mind of defilements, by developing insight into one's own nature. This, really, is Vipassana: experiencing one's own reality, through the systematic and dispassionate observation of the ever-changing mind-matter phenomenon manifesting itself as sensations within oneself. This is the culmination of the teaching of the Buddha: self-purification through self-observation.

This can be practised by one and all. The disease is not sectarian, therefore the remedy cannot be sectarian: it must be universal. Everyone faces the problem of suffering. When one suffers from anger, it is not Buddhist anger, Hindu anger, Christian anger. Anger is anger. Due to anger, when one becomes agitated, it is not a Christian agitation, or Hindu, or Buddhist agitation. The malady is universal. The remedy must also be universal.

Vipassana is such a remedy. No one will object to a code of living which respects the peace and harmony of others. No one will object to developing control of the mind. No one will object to developing insight into one's own reality, by which it is possible to free the mind of negativites. It is a universal path. It is not a cult. It is not a dogma. It is not blind faith.

Observing the reality as it is, by observing truth inside-this is knowing oneself at the actual, experiential level. And as one practises, one starts coming out of the misery of defilements. From the gross, external apparent truth, one penetrates to the ultimate truth of mind and matter. Then one transcends that and experiences a truth which is beyond mind and matter, beyond time and space, beyond the conditioned field of relativity: the truth of total liberation from all defilements, all impurities, all suffering. Whatever name one gives this ultimate truth is irrelevant. It is the final goal of everyone.

May all of you experience this ultimate truth. May all people everywhere come out of their defilements, their misery. May they enjoy real happiness, real peace, real harmony.

MAY ALL BEINGS BE HAPPY

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Chain of Teaches

Ven Ledi Sayadaw, Saya Thetgyi (1873-1945),Sayagyi U Ba Khin (1899-1971) and S.N.Goenkaji(1924-2013) as he is widely and respectfully referred to, is well known in numerous countries of the world as a master teacher of meditation. He received the technique that he teaches in the 1950’s from Sayagyi U Ba Khin of Burma, who in turn received it from Saya Thet, who received it in turn from the venerable monk, Ledi Sayadaw, who in turn received it from his own teacher in a long line of teachers descended directly from the Buddha. The achievement of this line of teachers in preserving the technique through such a long period of time is extraordinary, and a cause for gratitude in those who practise it. Now, in a world hungry for inner peace, there has been an extraordinary spread of the technique in Goenkaji’s lifetime.

In spite of his magnetic personality and the enormous success of his teaching methods, Goenkaji gives all credit for his success to the efficacy of Dhamma itself. He has never sought to play the role of a guru or to found any kind of sect, cult or religious organisation. When teaching the technique he never omits to say that he received it from the Buddha through a chain of teachers down to his own teacher, and his gratitude to them for the benefits that he has personally gained in his own meditation is evident. At the same time, he continually emphasises that he does not teach Buddhism or any kind of "ism," and that the technique that he teaches is universal, for people from any religious or philosophical background or belief.

Although his family was from India, Goenkaji was brought up in Burma, where he learnt the technique from his teacher Sayagyi U Ba Khin. After being authorised as a teacher by U Ba Khin he left Burma in 1969 in response to his mother’s illness, to give a ten-day course to his parents and twelve others in Bombay. The inspiration that he imparted and the extraordinary results of his teaching led to many more such courses, first in campsites around India and then later in centres as these began to spring up. From 1979 onwards he also started giving courses outside India, notably in Sri Lanka, Thailand, Nepal, France, England, North America, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. All of these countries today have one or more centres.

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Mr.S.N.Goenka

"The only conversion involved in Vipassana is from misery to happiness, from bondage to liberation," by S.N. Goenka

Mr. Satya Narayan Goenka (born 1924) is the Principal Teacher of Vipassana, the practical quintessence of the Buddha's teaching. A leading industrialist in Myanmar(Burma) after the Second World War, Goenkaji, as he is affectionately known outsideIndia, is living proof that the mental exercise of meditation is necessary for a wholesome and beneficial life. Known for his humility, deep compassion, unperturbed composure, Mr. Goenka's emphasis on the self-dependant, non-sectarian and result oriented nature of Vipassana found appeal in a world searching for a practical path out of stress and suffering.

As an indicator of the increasing universal acceptance of the Buddha's scientific teachings, Mr. Goenka has been invited to lecture by institutions as diverse as the United Nations General Assembly, members of the Indian Parliament, Harvard Business Club, Dharma Drum Mountain Monastery (of Ven. Sheng Yen) in Taiwan, the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, the Smithsonian Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Silicon Valley Indian Professionals Association.

Mr. Goenka's success in service comes from being an inspiring example and an ideal, and of practicing what he asks his students to practice. "Develop purity in yourself if you wish to encourage others to follow the path of purity," he told an annual meeting in Dhamma Giri, Igatpuri, on March I, 1989. "Discover real peace and harmony within yourself, and naturally this will overflow to benefit others."

Mr. Goenka is a tireless worker. In 2002, at the age of 78, he undertook a remarkable Dhamma tour of the West. Accompanied by his wife Illaichidevi Goenka, a few senior teachers and students, he traveled for 128 days through Europe and North America, joyfully sharing the priceless gift of Vipassana. The second leg of the tour was a 13,000-mile road journey in a motor caravan through the United States and Canada.

On the 62nd day of this Dhamma Odyssey, on June 10, 2002, Mr. Goenka told a crowded gathering at Sonoma State University,Santa Rosa, CA:

"Throughout life, one encounters things that one does not like, and is separated from things one likes. The Buddha went to the root of this problem, and discovered the solution (of Vipassana) for liberation from all misery. He realized that we keep reacting to the pleasant and unpleasant sensations we feel on the body, with craving and aversion. And due to these mental impurities or habit patterns, we remain agitated and miserable."

In Vipassana, Mr. Goenka found the way out of his miseries experienced in his early life. Born in Mandalay, Myanmar, in a business family of Indian origin, he became one of Myanmar's ranking business leaders, with offices in many countries. By age 30, he was elected president of the Yangon (formerly Rangoon) Chamber of Commerce and head of many social, educational and cultural organizations.

Mr. Goenka had outstanding success, but not inner peace. Instead, stress brought on crippling migraine headaches, which the world's best doctors were helpless to treat, except with addictive and debilitating drugs. Besides, Mr. Goenka said, he was a very short-tempered, egoistic, person making himself and others around him miserable.

It was at this point that Mr. Goenka met and was inspired by a unique personality in post-war Myanmar: Sayagyi U Ba Khin, the first Accountant-General of independent Myanmar. U Ba Khin also taught Vipassana and worked to spread its practice in public life.

While Vipassana is firmly rooted in the true teachings of the Buddha, Mr. Goenka emphasizes that it is not a religion and involves no dogma, rites, rituals, and no conversion. "The only conversion involved in Vipassana is from misery to happiness, from bondage to liberation," he told an applauding audience at the World Peace Summit at the United Nations, New York, in 2000.

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Thousands of Catholic priests, Buddhist monks and nuns, Jain ascetics, Hindu sanyasis come to Vipassana courses along with other religious leaders. Vipassana is the practical quintessence of all religions, to develop the experiential wisdom to live a happy, productive life. In the words of Sayagyi U Ba Khin, Vipassana offers results that are "good, concrete, vivid, personal and immediate."

In 1969, U Ba Khin authorized Mr. Goenka to go to India and teach Vipassana, as his representative. Since then, the Ganges of Dhamma again started flowing in the land of its origin. From India, Vipassana is spreading worldwide, including in the USA, Europe, Asia-Pacific, China, Russia, Latin America, East European countries and now Africa.

Since 1969, Goenkaji and his wife are conducting Vipassana courses. Mrs Goenka, known fondly as 'Mataji' (meaning 'respected mother'), is also a Principal Teacher and a distinguished student of Sayagyi U Ba Khin. She has quietly supported and selflessly served in her husband's mission of gratitude to their beloved teacher, Sayagyi U Ba Khin: how to serve more and more beings in benefiting from the liberating path of Vipassana.

After arriving in India, Mr. Goenka soon retired from his flourishing business and devoted his full time to teaching Vipassana. Besides being the gentle patriarch to a large joint family of his six sons and grandchildren, he is the benevolent guide of a growing, highly de-centralized and disciplined organization.

To meet the increasing demand, presently over 800 assistant teachers conduct courses on Mr. Goenka's behalf, using recorded audio and video instructions, with the help of thousands of volunteers. There is no fee for the teaching. Neither Mr. Goenka nor the assistant teachers get any financial or material gain from these courses.

Mr. Goenka elaborated in a talk at Dhamma Nasika, in Nashik city, near Igatpuri, India, on March 5, 2005:

"Dhamma is invaluable. As soon as a fee is charged, it will become the Dhamma of the rich. Those who have money will try to gain peace by paying the highest price. But they cannot gain peace because when Dhamma becomes a commercial commodity, it fails to bring peace. No one should make the mistake, now or in the future, of turning a Vipassana centre into a commercial organization."

A prolific writer and poet, Mr. Goenka writes in English, Hindi and Rajasthani. He quotes the Buddha's words: "Those who have a strong feeling of gratitude, and a wish to serve others without expecting anything, are very rare people." With his over 50 years of dedicated Dhamma service, Mr. Goenka belongs to that very rare category.

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General

Bilingual courses are courses which are taught in two languages. All students will hear daily meditation instructions in both languages. The evening discourses will be heard separately.

Old students are those who have completed a 10-day Vipassana Meditation course with S.N. Goenka or his Assistant Teachers. Old students have the opportunity to provide Dhamma Service at the courses listed.

All courses are run solely on a donation basis. All expenses are met by donations from those who, having completed a course and experienced the benefits of Vipassana, wish to give others the same opportunity. Neither the Teacher nor the assistant teachers receive remuneration; they and those who serve the courses volunteer their time. Thus Vipassana is offered free from commercialisation.

Meditation courses are held at both center and non-center locations. Meditation centers are dedicated facilities where courses are held regularly throughout the year. Before meditation centers were established in this tradition, all courses were held at temporary sites, such as campgrounds, religious retreat centers, churches and the like. Today, in regions where centers have not yet been established by local students of Vipassana who live in the area, 10 Day meditation courses are held at non-center course sites.

Course Type

Old Student Short Courses (1-3 days) are for any student who has completed the 10-day course with S.N. Goenka and his assistant teachers. All old students are welcome to apply to attend these courses, including those where it has been some time since their last course.

10-day Courses are an introductory course to Vipassana Meditation where the technique is taught step-by-step each day. The courses begin after a 2 - 4 pm registration period and orientation, followed by 10 full days of meditation, and end the morning of the 11th day by 7:30 am.

10-day Executive Courses are an introductory course to Vipassana Meditation especially for business executives and government officials where the technique is taught step-by-step each day. For more information please visit the Executive course website. The courses begin after a 2-4 pm registration period and orientation, followed by 10 full days of meditation, and end the morning of the 11th day by 7:30am.

10-day Courses for Old Students have the same timetable and discipline as 10-day courses. These courses are open to serious old students who have completed at least three 10-day courses and one Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta course, have not been practising any other meditation techniques since last 10-day course, have been practising this technique of Vipassana for at least one year, are trying to maintain the five precepts in their daily lives, and trying to maintain daily practice.

Special 10-day Courses are open only to serious Old Students committed to this technique who have completed a minimum of five 10-day courses, one Satipatthana Sutta course, given Dhamma Service at least one 10-day course, and have been practicing regularly for at least two years.

20-day Courses are open only to serious Old Students committed to this technique who have completed a minimum of five 10-day courses , one Satipatthana Sutta course, given Dhamma Service at least one 10-day course, and have been practicing regularly for at least two years.

30-day Courses are open only to serious Old Students committed to this technique who have completed a minimum of six 10-day courses (one since their first 20-day course), one 20-day course, one Satipatthana Sutta course, and have been practicing regularly for at least two years.

45-day Courses are open only to persons involved in Dhamma Service and Assistant Teachers who have completed a minimum of seven 10-day courses (one since their first 30-day course), two 30-day courses, one Satipatthana Sutta course, and have been practicing regularly for at least three years.

60-day Courses are open only to active Teachers and Assistant teachers who have completed two 45 Day courses and conduct at least 4 courses annually.

This is 7 Days Vipassana course for Teenagers of age group 15 to 19 years old.

Children's Courses are open for all children aged 8-12 years old who wish to learn to meditate. Their parents/guardians do not have to be meditators.

Old Student Programs are similar to Service Periods where there is time to work on a variety of Centre maintenance, construction, household and gardening projects, but have a more full and structured program, an opportunity to meet with assistant teachers, and possibly committee and trust meetings. All Old Students are welcome to participate. The daily program will include three group sittings with morning and afternoon work periods and in the evening there will be tapes played of special discourses and talks that S.N. Goenka has given to Old Students.

Open Houses are held between meditation courses. All are welcome to attend and learn about Vipassana Meditation and the Center.

Satipatthana Sutta Courses have the same timetable and discipline as 10-day courses. The difference is that in the taped evening discourses the Satipatthana Sutta is carefully examined. This is the principal text in which the technique of Vipassana is systematically explained. These courses are open to serious old students who have sat (not including courses served) at least three 10-day courses, have not been practising any other meditation techniques since last 10-day course, have been practising this technique of Vipassana for at least one year, and who are trying to maintain their meditation practice and the five precepts in their daily lives, at the very minimum from the time of applying to the course.

Old Student Self Courses have the same timetable and discipline as a 10-day course. The difference is that there is no teacher in attendance. These courses are open to serious old students who have completed at least three 10-day courses, have not been practicing any other meditation techniques since their last 10-day course, have been practicing this technique of Vipassana for at least one year, and who are trying to maintain the five Precepts in their daily lives.

Service Periods have been set aside to work on a variety of Centre maintenance, construction, household and gardening projects. All Old Students are welcome to participate. The daily program will include three group sittings with morning and afternoon work periods. On selected evenings, there will be tapes played of special discourses and talks that S.N. Goenka has given to Old Students.

Teenagers' Anapana Courses are available for teens in different age ranges from 13-18 years old. Their parents/guardians do not have to be Vipassana meditators.

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10-day Courses are an introductory course to Vipassana Meditation where the technique is taught step-by-step each day. The courses begin after a 2 - 4 pm registration period and orientation, followed by 10 full days of meditation, and end the morning of the 11th day by 7:30 am.

Lumbini Tour :

Feb 2008

The Dhamma Tour Organized by Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Center Nanded.Courses are given in numerous Meditation Centers and at Non-Center course locations at rented sites. Each location has its own schedule of courses. In most cases, an application for admission to these courses can be completed online at this website.

Anapana Dabhad Dhammaparishad :

12 Jan 2015

The Dhamma Tour Organized by Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Center Nanded.Courses are given in numerous Meditation Centers and at Non-Center course locations at rented sites. Each location has its own schedule of courses. In most cases, an application for admission to these courses can be completed online at this website.

Shrilanka Tour :

12 Feb 2015

The Dhamma Tour Organized by Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Center Nanded.Courses are given in numerous Meditation Centers and at Non-Center course locations at rented sites. Each location has its own schedule of courses. In most cases, an application for admission to these courses can be completed online at this website.

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Donation

महाफलदायि दान

दान गृहस्थ के लिये महत्वपूर्ण मंगल है। किसी भी गृहस्थ का कंगाल होना दुर्भाग्यपूर्ण है। उसके लिये कठिन परिश्रम करके ईमानदारी के साथ धन कमाना आवश्यक होता है। उसे अपना ही नही अपने परिवार का और अपने पर आश्रित सभी लोगों का भरण पोषण करना होता है। परंतु जो धन कमाए उसमे से अपने सामर्थ्य के अनुसार कम या अधिक दान देना भी उतना ही आवश्यक होता है। इससे त्याग की भावना बढ़ती है। जरूरतमंदों के प्रति सहानुभूति और करुणा की भावना बढ़ती है। केवल संचय, संग्रह और परिग्रह ही करे तो स्वार्थ बुद्धि बढ़ती है।आसक्ति का दुर्गुण बढ़ता है।औरो के प्रति स्नेह और सदभावना के स्थान पर हृदय की कठोरता और क्रूरता का दुर्गुण बढ़ता है। दान का पूण्य फल चित्त की चेतना पर निर्भर करता है। यदि भय की चेतना से दान देता है या बदले में सरकार अथवा समाज से कुछ सुविधा प्राप्त करने के लोभ से दान देता है अथवा यश और प्रसिद्धि प्राप्त करने की लालसा से दान देता है, अथवा औरो की तुलना में अधिक दान दे रहा हूँ इस दम्भ (arrogance)को जगाते हुए दान देता है अथवा याचना करने वाले के प्रति तिरस्कार जगाते हुए दान देता है, तो ऐसा दान पुण्यफलदाई नही होता, मांगलिक नही होता। परंतु श्रद्धा के भाव से, मैत्री और करुणा के भाव से, बिना बदले में कुछ प्राप्त करने के निःस्वार्थ भाव से दान देता है तो यह दान महान पूण्य फलदाई होता है, महान मंगलकारी होता है। मेरे द्वारा दिये गए दान से लोगो का कल्याण होगा, लोगों का कल्याण हो रहा है, लोगो का कल्याण हुआ है, यह देख कर चित्त की चेतना प्रसन्नता से भर उठती है, तो दान महाफलदायि होता है, महा मांगलिक होता है।

Highly beneficial Dana

When the mind of the donor is suffused with joy and delight before giving dana, while giving dana, and after giving dana, then the dana becomes pure in the past, present and future.

How does dana become pure in three ways?

When the mind of the donor is filled with benevolence; when the recipient is living a life of pure sila; and when the dana, irrespective of the amount and value, is earned by one’s own labour, honestly and through right livelihood; then the dana is pure in three ways. Dana that is pure in the past, present, and future, and pure in three ways is highly beneficial.

How does such dana help to develop the four brahmavihara?

When the thing or place or facility that is given as dana is not for a particular person but for the benefit and welfare of all meditators, this dana helps to develop the four brahmavihara.

1) The mind of the donor is filled with infinite metta when he thinks—“Because of my dana, countless people are gaining or will gain happiness by receiving this wonderful Dhamma”.

2) The mind of the donor is filled with infinite karuna when he thinks—“Because of this dana, there are so many suffering people in the world who will find a way out of their suffering, get the benefit of Dhamma and find contentment”.

3) The mind of the donor is filled with infinite mudita with the thought—“Oh! So many people are getting happiness and contentment through the practice of Dhamma because of my dana”.

4) The mind of the donor is filled with infinite upekkha with the thought—“Whether anyone praises mydana or criticizes it, whether I get success or failure because of this dana, it is of no concern to me. My dana is not for self-acclaim or for success or failure. This dana, given with pure volition, is solely for the benefit of others”.

Dana Parami?

According to the words of the Enlightened One, the dāna of Dhamma is the greatest of all. Why is it the greatest? Let us understand. According to the law of nature, the seed that we sow will give fruits, many fruits and each fruits will contain the same type of seed. If we give dāna of food, then the fruit will be that we will get sufficient food in our present life and future lives. According to the same law of nature, whatever type of dāna you give, you will get that type of fruit in the future in a greater quantity. When you give the dāna of Dhamma, the fruit that you will get is a greater quantity of Dhamma. As a result, one becomes stronger and stronger in Dhamma which helps one to reach the final goal. That is why the Enlightened One said that, “The dāna of Dhamma is the greatest dāna.” The Dhammadana of Developing our Parami. Dana: This is the quality of giving to others. Our gift to a center will be our efforts to practice correctly, coming back to sensations, not judging, maintaining our sila impeccably while we are there, our practice and development of metta, our service for the benefit of others, and our financial support to provide a good place for future students to meditate. As we help at the center, we do so with the thought that many students will gain the Dhamma or grow in the Dhamma because of our efforts. These efforts are our dana to a center. The proper way to give dāna. For any donation to contribute to the peace and harmony of the individual and the community, the volition behind the donation has to be that of compassion and goodwill. One who earns money tends to develop a big ego. And as long as there is ego, there is no peace. This is why a good meditator understands that one is earning not only for the maintenance of oneself and one’s dependants but also for others. One gives a bigger or smaller donation according to one’s capacity; the amount does not matter. Much more important is to give with a pure mind without expecting anything in return. Then the ego becomes less and less. Dāna becomes impure when one expects something in return. The dāna given with the volition to serve others and to help them come out of their misery helps one progress on the path to real peace. Business people earn more; therefore, it is all the more important for them to utilize part of this earning for the benefit of society.

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Rules for donations

Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Kendra is one of the numerous centers in the state of Maharashtra. It is located at the bank of Godawary river. It is near to Nanded city. Dhamma Niranjan vipassana centre is easily accessible by rail and ground transportation also.There are the references about the historical background in tipitac. As per the evidences in archeological survey, in the modern age it is proved that ever illuminating race of Dhamma reached Godavari territory in Marathwada region of Maharashtra during the life time of Lord Gautama the Buddha. The eye Kosal Brahmin named Bawari, Purohit of King Prasannajeet, had left Savathi (Capital of Kosal) to setup his hermitage on river Godavari.

* [All Donations are exempted under 80(G) of Income Tax.]

Ways of Donations

1. Donate Online

Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Kendra is one of the numerous centers in the state of Maharashtra.

Name of bank- Union Bank Of India

A/C-NO- 342902010008665

IFSC Code- UBINO534293

2. Donate through Chaque/Draft

All well wisher can donate by Chaque,Demand Draft,NEFT or RTGS in name of "Vipassana Kendra,Nanded"

Seekers can ask for receipt by giving their name and phone number.

Name of bank- Union Bank Of India

A/C-NO- 342902010008665

IFSC Code- UBINO534293

Frequently Asked Questions

Actually, the ten-day course is the minimum; it provides an essential introduction and foundation to the technique. To develop in the practice is a lifetime job. Experience over generations has shown that if Vipassana is taught in periods of less than ten days, the student does not get a sufficient experiential grasp of the technique. Traditionally, Vipassana was taught in retreats lasting seven weeks. With the dawning of the 20th century, the teachers of this tradition began to experiment with shorter times to suit the quickening pace of life. They tried thirty days, two weeks, ten days, down to seven days--and they found that less than ten days is not enough time for the mind to settle down and work deeply with the mind-body phenomenon.
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The day begins at 4:00 a.m. with a wakeup bell and continues until 9:00 p.m. There are about ten hours of meditation throughout the day, interspersed with regular breaks and rest periods. Every evening at 7:00 p.m. there is a videotaped lecture by the Teacher, S.N. Goenka, which provides a context for meditators to understand their experience of the day. This schedule has proved workable and beneficial for hundreds of thousands of people for decades.
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The teaching is given through recordings of S.N. Goenka, speaking in English or Hindi, together with a translation into a local language. Tape translations exist in most of the major languages of the world, including English. If the teachers conducting a course do not speak the local language fluently, interpreters will be there to help. Language is usually no barrier for someone who wants to join a course.
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Each student who attends a Vipassana course is given this gift by a previous student. There is no charge for either the teaching, or for room and board. All Vipassana courses worldwide are run on a strictly voluntary donation basis. At the end of your course, if you have benefited from the experience, you are welcome to donate for the coming course, according to your volition and your means.

How much are teachers paid to conduct courses?

Teachers receive no payment, donations or other material benefit. They are required to have their own private means of support. This rule means that some of them may have less time for teaching, but it protects students from exploitation and it guards against commercialism. In this tradition, teachers give Vipassana purely as a service to others. All they get is the satisfaction of seeing people's happiness at the end of ten days.
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If your doctor has prescribed a special diet, let us know and we will see whether we can provide what you need. If the diet is too specialized or would interfere with meditation, we might have to ask you to wait until you can be more flexible. We're sorry but students are required to choose from the food provided to them, rather than bring food for themselves. Most people find the choice is ample and they enjoy the simple vegetarian diet.

I can't sit cross legged. Can I meditate?

Certainly. Chairs are provided for those unable to sit comfortably on the floor because of age or a physical problem.
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Pregnant women may certainly attend, and many women come specifically during pregnancy to take advantage of the opportunity to work deeply and in silence during this special time. We ask pregnant women to ensure they are confident that their pregnancy is stable before applying. We provide the extra food they need and ask them to work in a relaxed way.
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All students attending the course observe "noble silence" — that is, silence of body, speech and mind. They agree to refrain from communicating with their co-meditators. However, students are free to contact the management about their material needs, and to speak with the instructor. Silence is observed for the first nine full days. On the tenth day, speech is resumed as a way of re-establishing the normal pattern of daily life. Continuity of practice is the secret of success in this course; silence is an essential component in maintaining this continuity.
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For a person in reasonable physical and mental health who is genuinely interested and willing to make a sincere effort, meditation (including "noble silence") is not difficult. If you are able to follow the instructions patiently and diligently, you can be sure of tangible results. Though it may appear daunting, the day's schedule is neither too severe nor too relaxed. Moreover, the presence of other students practicing conscientiously in a peaceful and conducive atmosphere lends tremendous support to one's efforts.
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Again, the purpose of Vipassana is not to cure diseases. Someone who really practices Vipassana learns to be happy and balanced in all circumstances. But a person with a history of severe depression may not be able to apply the technique properly and may not get the desired results. The best thing for such a person is to work with a health professional. Vipassana teachers are meditation experts, not psychotherapists.

Can Vipassana make people mentally unbalanced?

No. Vipassana teaches you to be aware and equanimous, that is, balanced, despite all the ups and downs of life. But if someone comes to a course concealing serious emotional problems, that person may be unable to understand the technique or to apply it properly to achieve the desired results. This is why it is important to let us know your past history so that we can judge whether you will benefit from a course.
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The point is that leaving early is shortchanging yourself. You don't give yourself a chance to learn the full technique and so you won't be able to apply it successfully in daily life. You also interrupt the process in the middle rather than letting it come to the proper conclusion. To get home a day or two early, you waste all the time you have invested.
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Vipassana is taught step by step, with a new step added each day to the end of the course. If you leave early, you do not learn the full teaching and do not give the technique a chance to work for you. Also, by meditating intensively, a course participant initiates a process that reaches fulfillment with the completion of the course. Interrupting the process before completion is not advisable.
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Center address

Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Center,
New Dunkin Water Purification plant,
Dist: Nanded, Maharashtra
India.

Pin 431601

+91 942 157 2377
+91 942 157 2488

niranjandhamma@gmail.com

How to reach

How to reach

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News,Blogs & Events

Dhamma Niranjan Vipassana Kendra is one of the numerous centers in the state of Maharashtra. It is located at the bank of Godawary river. It is near to Nanded city. Dhamma Niranjan vipassana centre is easily accessible by rail and ground transportation also.There are the references about the historical background in tipitac. As per the evidences in archeological survey, in the modern age it is proved that ever illuminating race of Dhamma reached Godavari territory in Marathwada region of Maharashtra during the life time of Lord Gautama the Buddha. The eye Kosal Brahmin named Bawari, Purohit of King Prasannajeet, had left Savathi (Capital of Kosal) to setup his hermitage on river Godavari. Bawari retired to a land “Antardeep” in Godavari where two kings Aasak and Alka gave him a tract of land. Bavari prepared a great Yajana “sacrifice”. He gifted away everything is Yajana. On the same time Another Brahmin appeared before him and demanded five hundred coins (kashyarpan). Bravari said “kindly pardon me I do not have anything to give you” The Brahmin curse Bravari and said “May your head on the 7th day cleave into 7th. Bravery became sorrowful and worried. It has so happened that Benevolent deity approach measurable Bravery and disclosed him that “the exact meaning of head splitting might be explained by some Buddha, perfectly enlightened”. So you can approach him to ascertained the meaning of it. After hearing the existence of Buddha, Bravery became happy and rejoicing. Bravery called his 16 eminent and learned disciples and explained them about the 32 marks to recognize the Buddha. He also disclosed his disciples that if some one generate the question inside the mind, Buddha will give the answer of their questions. Bravarie’s all 16 disciples departed towards North and through Alka, Patithan (modern Paithan), Mahisathi, Ujjeni… Saket and Savathi Rajgrah to Pasanakchetiya. When these disciples appeared before Buddha they got satisfied that such a great human being who bears 32 characteristic. Ajitha one of the 16 disciples of Bravari first ask the question followed by another disciples. In turn Buddha replied to all Bravari,s disciples and their 16,000 followers.

Double Gender (20-Male and 20-Female) 10-days courses have been started.

Mini Anapana Hindi by S.N.Goenka (Part 1)

Guidelines

  1. A Mini Anapana session should be conducted in a quiet hall or room suitable for meditation

  2. Participants must listen and practice carefully, sitting with their backs straight while maintaining complete silence through out the entire session

  3. Neither the person hosting the session nor anyone else should give any other instructions, live or recorded; the only instructions given should be that of Mr. Goenka’s Mini Anapana recording

  4. There should be no charge whatsoever for attending a Mini Anapana session

Note:Participants who attend Mini Anapana sessions will not be considered as “Old Students” in this tradition. They can not participate in any programs designated as “For Old Students only”.

Mini Anapana English by S.N.Goenka (Part 1)

Materials

Note:Pratice in silence place, make yourself available continuous for 30 min.(Download and play)

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Children Courses

Mastery over the mind is important in all human activity and purification of the mind is essential for true peace and happiness. School is an appropriate place to introduce this to children. Children can learn the first step of Vipassana--the technique of Anapana--at an early age.

The technique of Anapana is a simple and practical way to achieve mastery over the mind and lead a happy, wholesome life. Anapana means observation of natural, normal respiration, as it comes in and as it goes out.

Observation of breath is an ideal object for meditation because it is always available, non-sectarian and natural. It is also a truth pertaining to the self and closely related with the mind. Anapana is in this way, different from techniques based on artificial regulation of the breath. There are no rites and rituals involved in the practice of Anapana.

Anapana is the first step in the practice of Vipassana Meditation. Vipassana means, "to see things as they are". Vipassana is India's most ancient meditation technique, rediscovered by Gotama the Buddha nearly 2600 years ago. Vipassana is a universal, scientific and non-sectarian method towards purifying the mind. It is the practical essence of the teachings of the Buddha, who taught Dhamma - the Universal Law of Nature.

The ideal time to begin the first steps of this mental training is in childhood. Besides helping children to calm and concentrate their minds, Anapana helps them to understand themselves better and gives them an insight into the workings of their own minds. They develop an inner strength that helps them to choose right and appropriate actions over wrong actions, control and become master of their own mind.

Anapana provides them with a tool to deal with the fears, anxieties and pressures of childhood and adolescence. Because of its simplicity, children find the technique easy to understand and practice.

Course Format

To learn Anapana it is necessary to take an Anapana Course under the guidance of a qualified teacher.

There are two steps to the training:

In the first step the children make a conscious effort to abstain from all kinds of unwholesome actions. They undertake five moral precepts: practicing abstention from killing, stealing, lying, sexual misconduct and use of intoxicants. The observation of these precepts allows the mind to calm down enough to proceed for the next step.

Next they learn & practice Anapana meditation-- focussing attention on the breath as it comes in and goes out naturally.

The entire teaching in all these courses is conducted through audio & videotapes of Vipassana Acarya, Shri SN Goenkaji who reintroduced this teaching in India and many other countries. Each course is divided into small sessions of 30-40 minutes which includes both practice and understanding of the theory. Residential courses also include games and other creative activities. However more time is allocated to the practice of the technique.

The course concludes with the practice of Metta-bhavna (loving kindness or good will towards all) in which peace and happiness gained during the course is shared with all beings.

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Course Eligibility & Duration

Anapana courses are held regularly at permanent Vipassana centers and rented sites in different countries for children between 8 to 16 years. Generally separate courses are organized for age groups 8 to 12 years and 13 to 16 years. The courses are of different duration to suit every section of the society. Residential courses are for 3 or 2 days. There are also non-residential courses for 1 or 2 days. Children have to stay within the course premises for the entire duration of the course. They are also expected to refrain from all kinds of religious practices or other disciplines for that period. Girls and boys stay separately at all times during the course. To participate in the course children undertake to observe five precepts as mentioned above and observe course related disciplines.

Anapana courses are also being conducted at various Institutions like Schools, Orphan Homes, Homes for the Blind, Juvenile Homes, etc. at their request and subject to certain formalities for the benefit of their children.

Continuing the Practice after the Course

Continuity of practice is essential for children to get the true benefits of the technique. It is therefore recommended that the child be given an opportunity at home to continue practicing Anapana for a short period of 10 -15 minutes each day, after the course. They can also be encouraged to attend refresher courses.

VRI (Goverment circulars)

Ministry / State / Organization Date Language Subject Download link
Ministry of HRD, Govt. of India 12 July 1989 English Student Visa for Pali Programmes in VRI Click Here
Andhra Pradesh 08 September 2000 English Leave for Govt. Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Goa 11 May 2006 English Leave for Govt. Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Gujarat 01 May 2002 Gujarati & English Leave for Teachers in Gujarat for Vipassana Click Here
Gujarat 05 Aug 2010 Gujarati Permission letter from IGP Gujarat for Police Staff to attend Vipassana courses Click Here
Gujarat 05 May 2011 Gujarati Permission letter to conduct Vipassana courses in all prisons of Gujarat Click Here
Madhya Pradesh 01 May 1999 Hindi Training Department for Govt. Employees Click Here
Madhya Pradesh 25 May 1999 Hindi & English Training Department for Govt. Employees Click Here
Maharashtra 19 September 1995 Marathi For students under the Ministry of Sports & Social Welfare Click Here
Maharashtra 27 March 1996 English Vipassana for prisoners Click Here
Maharashtra 07 August 1996 English Leave for Govt. Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Maharashtra 19 June 1997 English Leave for MSEB Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Maharashtra 09 January 1998 Marathi Leave for MCGM Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Maharashtra 21 July 1998 Marathi Leave for Govt. Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Maharashtra 15 October 1999 Marathi Leave for PMC Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Maharashtra 27 June 2003 Marathi Leave for Govt. Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Maharashtra 03 August 2003 Marathi Leave for MSEB Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Maharashtra 24 February 2004 English Including Vipassana as part of training for IAS officers Click Here
Maharashtra 05 July 2011 Marathi Implementing Vipassana Courses as part of Training Programmes for Employees Click Here
Maharashtra 05 October 2011 Marathi & English Introducing Vipassana Meditation in Schools Click Here
Maharashtra 27 January 2012 Marathi Introducing Vipassana Meditation in Schools – Extended Circular introducing Mitra Upakram Click Here
Maharashtra 12 July 2012 Marathi Implementation Circular for Mitra Upakram Click Here
Maharashtra 12 July 2012 English Implementation Circular for Mitra Upakram (Translation) Click Here
New Delhi 09 March 2001 English Vipassana for prisoners & Jail Personnel Click Here
Rajasthan 15 October 1996 English Introducing Vipassana to Jail Personnel Click Here
Uttar Pradesh 22 June 2004 Hindi Introducing Vipassana for Civil Defence Personnel Click Here
Oil & Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC) 04 May 1998 English Sending Senior Employees for Vipassana Click Here
Oil & Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC) 12 September 2001 English Sending Employees for Vipassana Courses Click Here

The downloaded files will be in Adobe PDF format, for which you will need to install Adobe Reader. Kindly Click Here to download it if you do not have the software.

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Dhammagiri Edition

In the last few decades since the re-awakening of Vipassana in India, innumerable people in India and all over the world have come in contact with this technique. In 1971, the need was felt for a medium to serve as a link for all the students to keep in touch with the teachings. Accordingly the Institute took up the task of publishing a Hindi newsletter. Its objective is to serve as a source of inspiration and communication for the students of Vipassana Meditation. The Vipassana Newsletter is now published every month from Dhamma Giri in English and Hindi, and from regional centres in Gujarati, Tamil, and Telugu. It has more than 25000 subscribers spread over the world and is no available on this site in unicode font.

For more language Click here.